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Now that we're famous...

It was to be expected. Last month the clickrate on smarts increased dramatically, almost exponentially. Would we extrapolate, every person in the world able to use her mouse-finger (formerly called index-finger) would be clicking our site around March 2013. We are famous. And fame obviously spells influence in the digital world (naturally: clicks-fame-influence).
I am excited to see that 90% of our visitors last week came from Ukraine - we should definitely think about adapting to this demographic development by changing to russian: nastrovje (oh, how predictable. Yes, sorry).
Let me give you a glimpse of our main visitors: drocherof, bibikablog, fermersovet, haliava, infoscript, kinorubej, kinorubrika, lovejewel... I would never have guessed that those were interested in crosscultural debate! Especially since they sign up as being robots.
Well, the world is changing.
We shall auto-generate our posts. Then this could be a feedback-loop of writers and readers, the language could change to Assembler-code and nobody would really have to bother.
We are working on it.
But first I have to find a way to kick those robots' butts! §$%&!

Comments

Sandor Ragaly said…
Robots, with future hard- and software plugged into their expansion slots, can almost count as human persons, Carsten! But as a loop, regarding resources, why not recur to oldie-but-goldie
100 REM Hallo
110 GOTO 100
120 END (for service-friendly docu.
;-) Good luck fighting.
I just know a certain program on wordpress.com (the hosting-incl. version of mine) is very eager and has high numbers of spam found...

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