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Treehuggers!

I am not the person who get's to go places. Usually I am sitting in a damp office somewhere one or two floors below the basement of an unbelievably ugly office-building. So I don't have to think whom I could ask to water my plants. Which is good, because I neither have plants to water nor friends to ask.
But you might.
And you certainly solved that problem. But you know what? Your plant also needs light - sunlight if possible. Will you ask your neighbours to move the Hibiscus around your apartment while the sunlight wooshes through? No, you say, watering will have to do it. 
But there are people thinking seriously about that problem - and thinking hard they solved it. 
I bumped into those guys when I rediscovered the treehuggers.
I had almost forgotten them. Treehuggers, you say? I know. Me too. BUT. There is this one website, that I once ran into, when I read about the carnivorous robots that get their energy from digesting anything from fruitflies to your favourite puppy. They were covering that those days - who else did?!. And today I went back to their site and, bingo!, they are describing a Robotic Plant Drone that moves your houseplants to the sunny spots for you.
Exactly the kind of technology that can be described as disruptive rather than iterative. The type of daring science we need to push the frontiers of knowledge.
I just wanted to let you know.
In case you have plants, and vacation, and - no friends.

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